How to Cold Call to Get Hair & Makeup Jobs

So what is a cold call you might ask? A cold call is a common term used in business that refers to calling people you don’t know in order to find work. I know it may not sound appealing. To some of you it probably sounds down right frightening. I once had an assistant who didn’t even feel comfortable calling up new members of The Hair & Makeup Artist Network to welcome them to the network. She said, “I don’t like those types calls where your are telling them, hi I’m calling you, you don’t know me, but….” It was simply too far outside of her comfort zone to do it. But what if you don’t have any clients and you really don’t know a whole lot of people who can refer you work? What do you do? This is something you will have to face at some point of your career if not many times. We are self-employed. This means we have to hunt down the work. I don’t care if you are just getting out of school or if you have been working for a while. You will have to hustle to get the jobs and it doesn’t stop. Clients come and go. Production companies open and close and production people change jobs everyday. So the job search never stops. Here is how you find the job through cold calling:

1. Decide what type of work you really want to do (film, TV, print, commercial celebrity)
2. Make a list of companies or photographers you would like to work for
3. Call the company and find out who hires for Hair or Makeup (if you already don’t know)
4. Ask the person if they are crewing up for anything in the near future or ask if they have any projects coming up
5. Tell the person you would like to send over a link to your website
6. Only send a link to the page/ pages that are most relevant to the work the company or photographer does (if you can)
7. Ask what is the best way and time to follow up
8. Add this person or company into your contact database (outlook or entourage is really great for this)
9. Make a note to follow up at the time suggested in the conversation
10. Make sure you follow up on a regular basis (this is best either once a month or especially when you have new work to show)

It may sound scary or dull to do but this is how all businesses operate across the globe. If you want the clients you have to be proactive and persistent! If you aren’t willing to do this and the phone isn’t ringing with job offers, you have no one but your self to blame for your lack of employment. You can convince yourself there isn’t any work and blame it on the economy but the truth is that you create your own reality so make the cold calls. You will be glad you did.

Michelle Lee
For more career advice visit: www.hmartistsnetwork.com

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September 13, 2011. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Jobs, Hair & Makeup Marketing, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. 1 comment.

The Power of Networking with Your Peers

I was recently told by an artist they didn’t feel like our networking events were working for them because it was “just a bunch of Makeup Artists standing around staring at each other.” Yes we are a network of Makeup Artists and if you attend one of our events you will find yourself in a room full of your peers. I think the real problem isn’t that our networking events are filled with a room full of other artists. I think the issue is that Hair & Makeup Artists are under the misconception that all fellow artists are just their competition. But here are the hard facts: most of your work is going to come from other artists.

1. Film & Television Hair/Makeup Artists work in crews and that crew has a department head or a key that will hire you (not the producer).
2. Makeup Artists often bring the hairstylist onto a project (and vice versa) so take the time to network with them.
3. Network with more established artists (they often need an assistant or extra person on a job).
4. There are many times I am unable to do a job and I pass off work to other artists I know and trust with my clients.

Networking is sometimes an uncomfortable thing. It forces you to step outside of your comfort zone and introduce yourself to strangers. It’s not that networking with your peers doesn’t work because it does. It usually isn’t working because either you feel too awkward to introduce yourself or you feel intimidated by other artists. Or maybe it’s not working for you because you just don’t know how to network.

1. You have to feel confident enough to introduce yourself to others.
2. Don’t be afraid to tell them what you do and ask to trade work with them.
3. Don’t just give someone your card and expect they will magically call you. You have to ask for their card, make a note on the back about where you met, and take the time to follow-up with them.
4. Don’t just keep bugging people for work. Take the time to build the relationship with them over a period of time (lunch, dinner, drinks, event invites).

If networking with your peers isn’t working for you then I would reevaluate your approach. Start by building your networking of peers with a group of five people. Pass off a job with one or two of them and see what starts to happen. I’m sure you will start to see your jobs increase. And if you don’t, you need a new network of artists (either ones who are working or know how to network). Take these steps and your career will turn a corner, I promise.

September 6, 2011. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Jobs, Hair & Makeup Marketing, Networking, Party Event, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. Leave a comment.

Stop Being Lazy & Start Networking!

I’m always amazed at the small turn out of Hair & Makeup Artists at our networking events. As you all my know, we co-hosted the opening night red carpet gala for the Los Angeles Women’s International Film Festival. The event was a huge success! There must have been over 300 people at our event (most of which were filmmakers). Attendees included Sprague Hayden (24), Ileana Douglas, and Director Cheryl Hines. There had to have been over 200 filmmakers presents providing hair & makeup artists with optimum networking opportunity. Still the turn our for hair & makeup artists were low. I really don’t understand the mentality of today’s young professionals. There really seems to be this strange sense of entitlement with our peer group. It’s as if they expect that the work will just fall into their laps, or they believe that getting an agent will solve their problems. Agents certainly help, but there is not substitution for self-promotion. I have talked to agents and top artists alike, and the response is always the same. Agents from both Celestine and The Rex Agency have told me that an agent can only do so much. It would make their job easier if the artist would continue to network. I know an artist at Cloutier Agency who tells me that she needs to self-promote because her agency is only pushing the top artists.

People tell us that they would join our network if they could get work out of it. Our response is always the same. We are not an agency. We are a networking organization. Our job is to provide you with the tools for success by putting you in the same room with producers, directors, filmmakers like Cheryl Hines, and other celebrities so you can promote yourself. However, the work will not come to you unless you show up and participate. Ninety nine percent of all success if just showing up. If you are looking for a hand-out in this business, or if you are sitting around waiting for the phone to ring, you are in the wrong industry. You are self-employed which means it is up to you to bring in the clients. Job referrals will always come from people who know and like you, but that will never happen if you don’t get off the couch and build the relationship yourself. This is not an industry where you can just join a website and the work will start poring in. You must take control over your career and put some real effort into it if you want to be successful. So stop being lazy, stop waiting for the phone to ring, and start networking! For more information on our organization or networking events visit:

http://hmartistsnetwork.com/

http://hmartistsnetwork.com/events

Photos from our Red Carpet Gala:

Michelle Lee
Makeup Maverick
http://hmartistsnetwork.com/

April 2, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Jobs, Hair & Makeup Marketing, Networking, Party Event, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. Leave a comment.

Are Your Self Promotion Methods Working For You?

I see hair and makeup artists using their social networking websites as substitute for a personal website all the time and it drives me crazy! Social networking websites are great for online marketing but they are not substitute for a personal one. I know websites are expensive, but they are a long term investment in your business. The first thing you have to realize is that your freelance work is a business so you need to treat it like one. Can you imagine if Mac Apple displayed all their company and product information only on Facebook? If they did, would you take that company seriously? I wouldn’t! I would think that they were an inexperience rinky-dink company with little experience in the market place. The same thing is true with your marketing tools. Your website is a representation of you. In fact, in this day and age, websites really have replaced the tradition portfolio. It is what you send to potential employers to review you work and presentation is everything.

My advice is to take the time to create promotional materials that best represent your style and personality. This means you should package yourself in a way that says, “I know what I’m doing.” Your business card, comp cards, demo real, and website should be clean, easy to understand, and have some sort of uniformity to it. In fact, unless you are lucky enough to have been working for twenty years and have clients calling you, I think a logo is a smart investment as well. The idea behind the creating a logo is to brand yourself so you can stand out from the competition. I have a logo. Its on my Facebook page, my business cards, comp cards, demo reel, and website. My logo is my brand recognition and your website needs to yours.Your website should clean, easy to navigate, and have large visible photos of your work. It should contain not only your portfolio images, but your bio, contact information, resume, demo reel, and any press info as well. Each page should be search engine friendly and have its own web address. The individual web addresses are important so you can email specific pages of your work to prospective clients. People are busy and they have a short attention span. They are more likely to view your work if you show them only what is relevant to what they are looking for. They are not going to take the time to look at your work if they have to sort through your Myspace or Facebook profile for it. A website is like getting furniture. You are going to have it for a long time so make sure you spend the money to get something you really like.

For help with your website and promotional materials visit us at: www.hmartistsnetwork.com/business_and_entertainment_news

Michelle Lee
Makeup Maverick
www.hmartistsnetwork.com
www.mymakeupart.com

January 29, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Jobs, Hair & Makeup Marketing, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. Leave a comment.