How to Cold Call to Get Hair & Makeup Jobs

So what is a cold call you might ask? A cold call is a common term used in business that refers to calling people you don’t know in order to find work. I know it may not sound appealing. To some of you it probably sounds down right frightening. I once had an assistant who didn’t even feel comfortable calling up new members of The Hair & Makeup Artist Network to welcome them to the network. She said, “I don’t like those types calls where your are telling them, hi I’m calling you, you don’t know me, but….” It was simply too far outside of her comfort zone to do it. But what if you don’t have any clients and you really don’t know a whole lot of people who can refer you work? What do you do? This is something you will have to face at some point of your career if not many times. We are self-employed. This means we have to hunt down the work. I don’t care if you are just getting out of school or if you have been working for a while. You will have to hustle to get the jobs and it doesn’t stop. Clients come and go. Production companies open and close and production people change jobs everyday. So the job search never stops. Here is how you find the job through cold calling:

1. Decide what type of work you really want to do (film, TV, print, commercial celebrity)
2. Make a list of companies or photographers you would like to work for
3. Call the company and find out who hires for Hair or Makeup (if you already don’t know)
4. Ask the person if they are crewing up for anything in the near future or ask if they have any projects coming up
5. Tell the person you would like to send over a link to your website
6. Only send a link to the page/ pages that are most relevant to the work the company or photographer does (if you can)
7. Ask what is the best way and time to follow up
8. Add this person or company into your contact database (outlook or entourage is really great for this)
9. Make a note to follow up at the time suggested in the conversation
10. Make sure you follow up on a regular basis (this is best either once a month or especially when you have new work to show)

It may sound scary or dull to do but this is how all businesses operate across the globe. If you want the clients you have to be proactive and persistent! If you aren’t willing to do this and the phone isn’t ringing with job offers, you have no one but your self to blame for your lack of employment. You can convince yourself there isn’t any work and blame it on the economy but the truth is that you create your own reality so make the cold calls. You will be glad you did.

Michelle Lee
For more career advice visit: www.hmartistsnetwork.com

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September 13, 2011. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Jobs, Hair & Makeup Marketing, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. 1 comment.

What Happened To Ethics In Our Industry?

I was speaking to a forty year veteran makeup artist sometime ago and he brought up a valid point. He said that there was a time when you were able to do business in the entertainment industry on a hand shake. It really seems the days of ethical behavior has really gone out the window and dog-eat-dog has taken its place. I think it’s really is a sad day when you feel like you can trust anyone. I know things are tough right now, and everyone is in survival mode, but does that mean that you have to screw other people over just to get ahead? One of the biggest issues that that has been raised is the practice of severely under cutting the rates of other artists. There has been a lot of talk about how the newest generation of hair and makeup artists have been under cutting the veteran makeup artists rates so low that they can’t seem to make a decent wage anymore. I know the makeup and hair schools are pumping out new people into the work force every day. I realize that the new people just want to get their foot in the door, but you need to think about who you are hurting in the long run. It’s really important for the new generation to realize that when you grossly under bid for a job, or when you’re afraid to negotiate a higher rate, you are driving the rate down. We the experienced artists, are trying really hard to piece together a decent middle class lifestyle, and that won’t happen for anyone if the new people keep agreeing to work for $100 or for free. The union had the right idea from the beginning, keep the union rates standard and don’t go below that amount. They understood something very basic, when one person works for less then slowly everyone else will too. If this practice keeps up then very soon from now, there won’t be an industry for us to make a living from. It will all just be a cute hobby.

Years ago, when I worked in Washington DC, the makeup artists there all had set rate that everyone adhered to. It was considered to be a huge “no-no” to undercut someone because they wanted to keep the wages at a high standard. We live in Los Angeles here where union is king, but more and more of the work is coming from non-union. It astounds me that there really aren’t any standard non-union rates here. When I moved here, I asked a person who runs a well know workshop what the going rates were in Los Angeles. To my surprise she told me, “its whatever the market will bare.” I’m sorry but that is an unacceptable answer! Now we are in a recession and the “market” or producers will bare $100 for a day. I don’t know about you, but my rent won’t be covered on that day rate! I’m asking you to think long and hard about what you bid for a job and to do your homework before you start quoting numbers. If you don’t know what the going rate is for your craft then call a few other artists or a few local agencies. But please stop working for bare minimum! We must stick together on this issue if we want to keep making a living at our craft. I can guarantee you the day that the standard is $250 a day for 14 hours the producers will get very comfortable keeping it there.

For more information about rate negotiation watch our virtual classroom video on “Negotiating Rates With Cloutier Agency”: http://www.hmartistsnetwork.com/video_list

Michelle Lee
Makeup Maverick
www.hmartistsnetwork.com

March 9, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Jobs, Hair & Makeup Marketing, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. 1 comment.

Do You Know Who Hires For Hair & Makeup?

Most people who have worked in the entertainment industry a while definitely know who to send their resume to. However, I recently noticed in my blog search someone was inquiring on “who hires for hair and makeup?” So for this reason, I’m going to address this issue. Who hires freelance hair and makeup artists can vary widely depending upon budget and the medium you are working in. Here is the break down:

Print:
1. Most of the time it will be the photographer who will hire you, but sometimes it will be the art director or another hair or makeup artist.
2. If you are working with a celebrity, the celebrity’s publicist or “people” will hire you.
3. Catalogue on occasion might be the publicity firm or department but most of the time it will the photographer
4. Sometime the designer will hire you directly
5. In magazines sometimes it could be the magazine editor but most of the time the photographer will hire you

Bridal:
1. Bride
2. Wedding Planner
3. Salon
4. Photographer referral

Commercial/Music Video:
1. Makeup or Hair Artist (you assisting)
2. Director requests you
3. Producer
4. Art Director
5. Production Coordinator
6. Production Manager
7. The Music Label or Management Group
8. The Talent Requesting You

Film/Television:
Much of the time it will be the same as commercial and music video, but you can also submit to the VP or Head of Production

Music Tours:

Sometimes the manager of the artist, but most of the time it will be the tour manager.

As you can see, its really important to do your home work when promoting yourself. Make sure you don’t waste your time by sending your portfolio/resume to the wrong person. In my experience, if you don’t ask the right questions about who hires for a particular project, you could end up following up with the wrong person and no one will tell you otherwise. Make sure you ask a lot of questions about who hires when calling a production company. But more than likely, you are going to have to target specific directors, producers, and department heads that you want to work with. It is then your job to find a way to contact them, network, and build a relationship with that person.

For more information on this topic watch our virtual classroom video on “Creating A Hair or Makeup Portfolio With Cloutier Agency” http://www.hmartistsnetwork.com/client.php?action=add&id=2

Michelle Lee
Makeup Maverick
www.hmaristsnetwork.com

February 4, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Hair & Makeup Marketing, Networking, Working as a Hair or Makeup Artist. Leave a comment.